Nicotine is not addictive, no conclusive evidence found

Duh Go figure somebody finally added 2+2 and it finally equaled 4

 

Nicotine is not addictive, no conclusive evidence found

No conclusive evidence, clinical trials, or studies exist showing dependence to nicotine alone

The claim of nicotine having addictive properties is well accepted by professionals in the health and medical fields, but is not supported with definitive clinical evidence. Smokers have been told they are addicted by health professionals around the world. This tactic has a term called “proof by assertion.” Wikipedia’s definition of proof by assertion is “an informal fallacy in which a proposition is repeatedly re-stated regardless of contradiction.” Spoiler alert: tobacco is addictive. Nicotine, without additives, has never proven to be addictive on its own, specifically with non-smokers or never-smokers. These assertive claims need to be addressed properly.

There is no conclusive addiction evidence, only rhetoric

The claim of addiction to nicotine is always stated within the context and accompanied by chemicals and tobacco. Why demonize nicotine?  By taking tobacco out of the equation, nicotine is not the cause for addiction to smoking. If these unsubstantiated claims were true that nicotine is “highly addictive” and “more addictive than heroin,” wouldn’t nicotine products create addicts to their products, and wouldn’t health officials advise against using them? Absolutely not. The United States Federal Drug Administration changed nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) labels and stated “decades of research and use have shown that NRT products sold OTC do not appear to have significant potential for abuse or dependence.” Conclusion? There is no clinical evidence to support nicotine addiction.
The same conclusion is coming from consumers of e-cigarettes. When it comes to tobacco harm reduction, vaping products are taking smokers away from cigarettes. Nicotine provides a “throat hit” similar to what they experienced when smoking cigarettes, and satisfies the hand to mouth habit they’ve done for years. To reduce nicotine by choice is simple depending on the strength chosen. Some choose higher strength, some reduce strength over time, and others choose to go nicotine-free.

There’s more to nicotine

Nicotine isn’t taking any more bad press. The chemical is not only a derivative of tobacco, it’s in potatoes, peppers, and other nightshade plants. That’s right, you’ve been eating nicotine in your diet for years. Groundbreaking studies are taking nicotine to a whole new level and giving hope for Parkinson’s disease. A study from Vanderbilt University by Dr. Paul Newhouse showed no withdrawal symptoms from all non-smoking Alzheimer’s patients once they stopped using a nicotine patch, and none of them started smoking. Dr. Ki Hyeong Lee was faced with a four year old suffering from as many as 20 epileptic seizures a night in Orlando, Florida. He decided to “prescribe” a nicotine patch and the child’s “seizures stopped almost immediately,” giving this child a new lease on life.

There’s no conclusive evidence to point to showing any addiction to nicotine, alone, in an unaltered natural state. For any professional health or tobacco expert claiming nicotine is addictive in and of itself, I respectfully request that you show proper evidence, clinical research, and science in the comment section below — and I thank you for it in advance.

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8 thoughts on “Nicotine is not addictive, no conclusive evidence found

  1. harleyrider1978

    Study says smokers are not addicted to nicotine

    Craving for cigarettes is more to do with the mind than the addictive influence of nicotine. In other words, it is the psychological element of smoking that makes one addicted to cigarettes, a new study conducted by Israeli scientists has revealed.

    The psychological element of smoking is the key factor deciding the intensity of craving for cigarettes in a smoker compared to the physiological effects of nicotine as an addictive chemical, says Dr. Reuven Dar of Tel Aviv University’s Department of Psychology.

    “These findings might not be popular with advocates of the nicotine addiction theory, because they undermine the physiological role of nicotine and emphasize mind over matter when it comes to smoking,” says Dr. Dar, in his new study published in the Journal of Abnormal Psychology.

    Dr. Reuven Dar and his colleagues reached these conclusions after analyzing the data from two landmark studies.

    The researchers monitored smoking behavior and craving levels of in-flight attendants, both women and men, who worked at the Israeli airline El Al. They were monitored during two flights — a long flight of between 10 to 13 hours like Tel Aviv to New York and a two-hop shorter trip from Israel to Europe and back, each leg lasting three to five hours.

    The study team then analyzed the responses of the El Al staff to a questionnaire and found that the duration of the flight had no significant impact on craving levels. In fact it was similar for short and long flights. Moreover, craving levels at the end of each short flight were much higher than those at the end of the long flight. This showed that cravings increased in anticipation of the flight landing, whatever the flight’s total duration.

    Therefore, the craving effect is produced by psychological reasons rather than by the physiological effects of nicotine deprivation.

    A similar study conducted in 2005 amongst religious Jews, forbidden by their religion to smoke on the Sabbath, also found nicotine to be not addictive as physiological addictions are usually defined.

    It is not that nicotine plays no role. The chemical does have a physiological role in increasing cognitive abilities such as attention and memory, it’s not an addictive substance like heroin, which creates true systemic and biologically-based withdrawal symptoms in the body of the user, Dr Dar says.

    He believes the latest research will help clinicians and health authorities develop more successful smoking cessation programs than those utilizing expensive nicotine patches or gum.

    http://www.medicaldaily.com/study-says-smokers-are-not-addicted-nicotine-231158

    Liked by 1 person

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  2. michaeljmcfadden

    I don’t know how this particular piece of research was followed up on, but about 15 years ago there was an AP story that I excerpted when writing “Brains” :

    “Scientists say they have identified a gene that, when defective, helps protect some people from getting hooked on cigarettes…. (This gene) tells the body how to make an enzyme… that breaks down nicotine. Defective forms of this gene lead to a defective version of the enzyme, impairing the body’s ability to process nicotine.”
    –Malcolm Ritter, Associated Press, NY 6/24/98

    So, it is possible that some or even many nonsmokers are actually, technically “genetically defective”! LOL! The scary thing is that there are enough fanatical Antismokers out there that, once the technology is available, they’ll start pushing for “responsible parents” to genetically modify their children “to protect them from a lifetime of addiction!”

    Now that may not seem like such an outright terrible idea on its surface, right? And hey, we could maybe apply it to heroin and crack cocaine as well.

    Of course, you know that once that line has been crossed, alcohol won’t be far behind, and, hey, looky that gene over there that encourages promiscuous teenage sex! Doncha wanna keep your little darlin’ from gettin’ preggers? (Oh, and let’s stop them from enjoying punk rock or rap music while we’re at it, OK?)

    Step by step, one little slice of freedom at a time. Go back in your memory just twenty years and consider how smoking bans in bars, or outdoors in parks or on college campuses, or in people’s private homes and apartments were regarded. Think how many companies back then refused to hire smokers or would fire someone for smoking in their own homes on their own time. Think about how a tax increase on a pound of rolling tobacco could go from $1/pound to $24/pound at the swish of a single presidential pen, and whether such a president would have dared lie about it just a few months later on national television. (See: Pro-Choice Smoking Doctor for the quick vid on that.)

    Remember: it’s easy to crack those doors open a little bit … much harder to control or close them later on.

    Like

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  3. Raymond T. Barfoot

    dear harley, it is me, raymond b. from over at frank,s blog i am adding your blog to my internal memory(in my head naturally)as a personal favorite.i agree with much of what you point out daily.I also defy anyone to tell me how to live my life.I like who i am and absolutely hate to be told who i may or may not:talk to assosiate with,what i may or may notdo in the privacy of my own apartment. also i like you plain-spoken opinion.anyhow it is nice to meet you. also i am on facebook just look up ray barfoot or raymond barfoot..or freind request me i will confirm.besides you mirror many of my sentiments almost 100%. yours sincrely, raymond barfoot

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  4. harleyrider1978

    michaeljmcfadden
    February 18, 2016 at 1:25 am
    Your comment is awaiting moderation.

    I don’t know how this particular piece of research was followed up on, but about 15 years ago there was an AP story that I excerpted when writing “Brains” :

    “Scientists say they have identified a gene that, when defective, helps protect some people from getting hooked on cigarettes…. (This gene) tells the body how to make an enzyme… that breaks down nicotine. Defective forms of this gene lead to a defective version of the enzyme, impairing the body’s ability to process nicotine.”
    –Malcolm Ritter, Associated Press, NY 6/24/98

    So, it is possible that some or even many nonsmokers are actually, technically “genetically defective”! LOL! The scary thing is that there are enough fanatical Antismokers out there that, once the technology is available, they’ll start pushing for “responsible parents” to genetically modify their children “to protect them from a lifetime of addiction!”

    Now that may not seem like such an outright terrible idea on its surface, right? And hey, we could maybe apply it to heroin and crack cocaine as well.

    Of course, you know that once that line has been crossed, alcohol won’t be far behind, and, hey, looky that gene over there that encourages promiscuous teenage sex! Doncha wanna keep your little darlin’ from gettin’ preggers? (Oh, and let’s stop them from enjoying punk rock or rap music while we’re at it, OK?)

    Step by step, one little slice of freedom at a time. Go back in your memory just twenty years and consider how smoking bans in bars, or outdoors in parks or on college campuses, or in people’s private homes and apartments were regarded. Think how many companies back then refused to hire smokers or would fire someone for smoking in their own homes on their own time. Think about how a tax increase on a pound of rolling tobacco could go from $1/pound to $24/pound at the swish of a single presidential pen, and whether such a president would have dared lie about it just a few months later on national television. (See: Pro-Choice Smoking Doctor for the quick vid on that.)

    Remember: it’s easy to crack those doors open a little bit … much harder to control or close them later on.

    Like

    Like

    Reply

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